The following pool of research seeks to inform readers about SUDI so that the community is best informed about its associated risk factors.

This research effectively informs our key messaging around SUDI, which is disseminated to a range of stakeholders including whānau, communities and health professionals.

Research Finding Calendar - Download

“Ashamed, Silent and Stuck in a System”—Applying a Structural Violence Lens to Midwives’ Stories on Social Disadvantage in Pregnancy

Eva Neely, Briony Raven, Lesley Dixon, Carol Bartle, and Carmen Timu-Parata

2020

Historical and enduring maternal health inequities and injustices continue to grow in Aotearoa New Zealand, despite attempts to address the problem. Pregnancy increases vulnerability to poverty through a variety of mechanisms. This project qualitatively analysed an open survey response from midwives about their experiences of providing maternity care to women living with social disadvantage. We used a structural violence lens to examine the effects of social disadvantage on pregnant women.

Maternal mental health in the time of the COVID‐19 pandemicWith the pandemic of Coronavirus disease -19 (COVID -19) spiralling out of control, the world is desperately frazzled at the moment. A few empirical studies related to this pandemic have reported

Suraj Bahadur Thapa, Simone Schwank, Anustha Mainali, Ganesh Acharya

2020

With the pandemic of Coronavirus disease -19 (COVID -19) spiralling out of control, the world is desperately frazzled at the moment. A few empirical studies related to this pandemic have reported higher prevalence of mental health problems among women compared to men. In this context, pregnant women and new mothers could certainly be more vulnerable.

Pregnancy and COVID-19

Elizabeth A. N. Wastnedge, Rebecca M. Reynolds, Sara R. van Boeckel, Sarah J. Stock, Fiona C. Denison, Jacqueline A. Maybin, and Hilary O. D. Critchley

2020

This research review evaluates the evidence of the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection throughout pregnancy. They examine the physiological adaptations to pregnancy and the implications for COVID-19, as well as COVID-19’s impact on pregnancy outcomes, and consider areas of uncertainty where more research is needed.

Pregnancy and COVID-19

Elizabeth A. N. Wastnedge, Rebecca M. Reynolds, Sara R. van Boeckel, Sarah J. Stock, Fiona C. Denison, Jacqueline A. Maybin, and Hilary O. D. Critchley

2020

This research review evaluates the evidence of the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection throughout pregnancy. They examine the physiological adaptations to pregnancy and the implications for COVID-19, as well as COVID-19’s impact on pregnancy outcomes, and consider areas of uncertainty where more research is needed.

Maternal smoking and preterm birth: An unresolved health challenge

Sarah J. Stock, Linda Bauld

2020

In this issue of PLOS Medicine, two studies provide new insights into the implications of exposure to tobacco smoke in pregnancy for perinatal and childhood outcomes. Buyun Liu and colleagues studied preterm birth in relation to timing and intensity of maternal smoking in more than 25 million singleton mother–infant pairs using United States birth certificate data.

Experiences of breastfeeding during COVID19: Lessons for future practical and emotional support

Natalie Shenker, Amy Brown

2020

The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown and social distancing led to changes to breastfeeding support available to women in the United Kingdom. Face to face professional support was reduced, and face to face peer support was cancelled. Anecdotal media accounts highlighted practices separating some mothers and babies in hospitals, alongside inaccurate stories of the safety of breastfeeding circulating. Meanwhile, new families were confined to their homes, separated from families and support networks.

Te Hā o Whānau: A culturally responsive framework of maternity care

Kendall Stevenson, Sara Filoche, Fiona Cram, Beverley Lawton

2020

AIM: A nuanced healthcare framework, Te Hā o Whānau, aims to make the maternal-infant healthcare system more accessible and culturally responsive for Māori following unexpected events that led to the harm or loss of their baby.