Many of the 44 babies who died of cot death in 2015 were living in damp, cold conditions - including converted garages and even cars.

A report released today shows rates of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) have dropped drastically, but not for everyone.

Many health professionals from all over Aotearoa come together to share kōrero about Māori health, SUDI prevention and ways to make change for our tamariki and mokopuna.

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New Zealand's high rates of infant deaths places it near the bottom of the OECD, with opposition parties blaming inequality and poverty for the country's poor record compared to the rest of the developed world.

Poor healthcare; poor housing; lack of access to a midwife or maternity carer; and poor health in the mother have all been blamed by experts for the poor statistics.

Milestones achieved by Whakawhetū over the last two decades.

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Sudden death rates for babies in Northland have halved but Maori infants still make up more than 90 per cent of overall deaths.

In a bid to reduce the number of babies suffocating in bed with their parents, the government is to fund pēpi pods, which allow for safe bed sharing.

Health Minister Jonathan Coleman has announced plastic pēpi pods would be rolled out nationally but could not confirm whether wahakura would be too.

How smoking and bed-sharing increases risk factors for SUDI

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